About your Search

20130107
20130115
STATION
CSPAN 68
LANGUAGE
English 68
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)
were on the ground during the 2012 elections discuss how volunteers and run voting precincts with long lines, people showing up at the rahm polling place, and other issues. the event was hosted by the elections commission, which was established in reaction to the 2000 presidential election. this is 90 minutes. >> good morning, everyone. my name is a house miller. i am the director and chief operating officer of the elections commission. i want to thank you for being with us today. i wanted to care panelists. -- to thank our panelists. we're having a discussion on the 2012 elections, with -- and with the group we have gathered, we will be able to accomplish this easily and i want to inform the audience watching that we have an actor -- active twitter account that will be able to respond to questions. #beready2012. we have four panels of some of the representative cross-section of election workers, administrators, and research advocates as well as state and local election officials. in short, here to discuss the 2012 presidential election are observers of elections and those who monitor
to be done about it. >> more afghans thought the election was -- had been very corrupt and had been very satisfied with the result. so they can hold both concepts that are the media, which seems able to do. we recently did a study assumes to press against any and embarrass perspective. we looked at 20 post conflict read election conflicts, peacekeeping and peace enforcement efforts, the biggest fear -- the big enforcement efforts. the monthly smaller u. n ones and a dozen or more other places. we evaluated them on and at the of places. also, did they approach of the democratization and freedom house chorus to rank them. did they produce of the government, we used indices and they rick every government in the world. did the economy expanded? did did the citizens improved and the nearly use the human development index which looks of both levels of in, but also education and health and other criteria. in democratization, afghanistan did not pass the test. that is definitely a failure. it was about the metal in terms of how much of it was democratized. but in to a government effectiveness, i
been active in democratic circles. she was the national director for howard dean's 24 -- 2004 election. she helped to unseat an 18 year republican incumbent. stephanie also managed the campaign of senator frank and i and minnesota. she defeated norm coleman, correct? she is a graduate of c-span.o [indiscernible] university in minnesota. she has a lot to say and then we will field questions from all of you. thank you, stephanie. >> thank you all so much for coming out. good morning. again, my name is stephanie schriock, president of emily's list. as mentioned, i grew up in butte, montana, where my heart and soul still reside. special thanks to the national press club for setting the solemn. it really is an honor for me to be here today. for those of you who do not know as much about emily's list, emily's list has been around for 27 years. we are solely committed to electing pro-choice democratic women to office up and down the ballot across the country. as mentioned, we had a good election cycle in 2012. two years before that, and would save like most folks, i was ready to see the 112th
will grow, there will be more elections. there will be more institutional reform. there will be a better government but afghanistan will continue to face problems, there may be violence and there might be other challenges as we move forward but the speed of progress will move and will not stop. will afghanistan remember the united states as a country that helped or a country that did not help? definitely afghanistan will remember the united states as a country that helped. definitely afghanistan will remember that it was the u.s. assistance that brought so much to afghanistan. who will forget the less pleasant aspect ours relationship and we will move forward in the gratitude of the help that the united states has provided to afghanistan and also our other neighbors. but from today as we move forward will this relationship be a emotional as it was at time as you have heard in the past many years? will this relationship billion more mature? this relationship has already grown mature. we recognize the united states interest and afghanistan and the region and the united states recognizes th
was president of mexico's federal electric institute during the 2006 elections. director general of the mexico based consultancy. senior advisor to the americas program. he is the author of a new book -- [speaking spanish] this is really the basis for understanding why some of the reforms are going on today, and by political parties are taking on a different direction. he is an economist in residence at the school of international service american university. he did his doctoral work at the university of chicago, and was a top economic diplomat in washington at the time of the naphtha negotiations. he was also chief of staff to the governor of the bank of mexico. more recently represented mexico during the task of leading up to the negotiations leading up to the u.s.-mexico initiative. he has been president of a number of key inflection points .uring u.s.-mexica he has served as ambassador to mexico and assistant secretary of state for western hemisphere affairs. is an author as well. remember his fabulous book, "the u.s. and mexico." he is now a senior counselor with the common group. -- cohe
is stephanie schriock. she is the president of emily's list. guest: this election was a mandate for women's leadership across the country. an historic number of women were sworn in it to congress last week. this election was also about women voters and women's issues, some of which i would prefer not having a debate about. we will see more and more women stepping up to run. host: 20 senators, 81 representatives in 2013. what issues to the brink when it comes to women's issues? guest: we have never had 20 women in the u.s. senate. it is a great benchmark to hit. i would like to see it at 50. we're adding diversity to the debate. we will end up with policies that are best for our committees. these women are bringing different perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of
to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is certainly not an elected country, it's sensitive to public criticism if you look at the train accident, which is their version of twitter, disciplined the party chief who was in charge of building up the railways. this guy who was seen as a god is on his way to prison because of corruption. think about the terrible things that go on in the world to people who are at the with him of the police chief or minorities or the terrible status that women are treated in much of the developing world. people have cameras. you can now anonymously report things. you can imagine a network where a bad thing is occurring. you can report it anonymously. you can have anonymous responders. you can build those kind of networks and they're in development now. the fact that everybody is connected has a large number of step functions and improvement there. think about health care. we were talking earlier in the video about 2050 about health care and people sort of snickered when the gentleman mentioned to it, the f.d.a. just approved the first
. look at the banker bailouts that we have had. henry paulson, even in the elections when congress voted it down the first time, the banker bail out the last month or so of george bush's administration. obama and mccain came off of the campaign trails. they got on the phone and they got the congressional black caucus to change their votes and twist some arms and it passed and obama became president. i announcing that is why he became president, but you have to look at where the money is coming from. host: he is asking questions about jack lew, the next secretary of treasury. dave clark from politico joins us to learn a little bit more about him. to the caller pose a question about his background, particularly about wall street, can you tell us and on his experiences there and what he brings to the white house? caller: most of his background is predominantly a denture washington. he was a top house aide for a long time. he worked in the clinton administration. in the obama administration he was also the director as well working at the state department. he did spend two or three years, 200
of elections, tried to work out something so we can get the accurate information out to your voters. that is the goal of the election officials, get them all the information they need. one of the most significant problems was unusual reports that were inaccurate that had this ripple effect throughout the county that caused huge problems throughout the election. i urge everyone to start working those relationships out now. get out the information. we have less and less and less information for voters, for media, for everyone. build this relationship now. >> ok. >> i want to take all little personal liberty here. i hope when i get back to work i will not be in trouble keeping but i want to talk about how we treat senior citizens. i often think we are not very comfortable. i know we have occurred stop ballot voting. -- curb ballot voting. we have senior citizens coming into the precinct. walking with canes, holding the hands of their children and great-grandchildren. they wanted to participate. some of the captains would get them out of line, bring them to the front of the line. some p
election campaigns, policies matter, as you said. we have enough wealth in this country that there is no reason why anybody in this country should be hungry. there's no reason why anybody in this country should be poor. it is an atrocity that so many children in the united states grow up in poverty. it is totally against the ideas that this country was founded on, that are powerful ideals that resonate with many people. what the occupy movement correctly is picking up on is, the government has not been responsive. it has been part of the problem. it has been creating policies that have made the situation for people worse, and we actually need better policies. we are not technically limited, we are politically limited. >> next question. >> in the interest of gender balance, i offered my spot to the young woman behind me, and she demurs, so here i am. i wish the entirety of this conversation or focused on the democratic party, whether it is and allied of our struggles and interest or not, and what, if anything, might be an alternative to that politically, not just in civil
that much of this is de influence of foreigners? will you stand down for elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because thousand americans were viciously murdered by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing for us to go after that organization, to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place, and because of the core with worked of our men and women in uniform and because of the corporation and the sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by the then host government, we achieved our central goal, which is -- or have come very close to achieving the central goal -- which is to decapaticate al qaeda. everything we have done over the last 10 years, from the perspective of the u.s. national security interests have been focused on that came. and at the end of this conflict, we are going to be able to say that the sacrifices that were made by those men and wo
and the prosperities that we have gained. in the past many years. we also discussed the issue of election in afghanistan and the importance of elections for the afghan people with the hope that we'll be conducting a free and fair election in afghanistan where our friends in the international community and particularly the united states will be assisting in conducting those elections. of course. where afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve and i'm sure we will conduct it in detai
of this president. we probably will start right away recruiting challengers for the next elections. local union leaders, local party officials, and activists. we would happily send out an e- mail in the district to those who support medicare and social security and medicaid cuts. host: have you ever want that at some members of congress? guest: we have launched it publicly in the more generic sense, saying this is a warning. we want to be transparent. we don't learn from this nuclear war. for someone like me woke up every day in 2008 and thought, what can i do today to get barack obama elected president. he publicly admitted that he put social security benefits on the table. that's not a position i want to be in and not what i worked for and to thousand eight. host: did you work for it in 2012? guest: our organization prioritized congress in 2012. our number one candidate was elizabeth warren. she's already been told, calling out aig and big wall street bankers yesterday. we raised $1.5 million from grassroots contributions in this last election cycle. we raised $100,000 before she even announc
with the lack of progress in their elected leaders. in 2009, the president pledged to cut the annual deficit in half but the end of his first term. instead, we have seen four straight years of trillion dollar deficits and national debt exceeding $16 trillion. rather than cutting waste list spending, the federal government added $4 billion each day to our gross national debt. this path is not sustainable. i support a more limited government that is focused on fulfilling its court duties and responsibilities. only then can we identified the national priorities were the of taxpayer funding. the constitution clearly states that the top right your the for congress is to provide for the common defense. despite this duty, nearly one trillion dollars in critical national security funding is scheduled to be dangerously cut from the defense budget over the next decade. all become some leaders in washington cannot get their priorities straight. as a member of the senate armed services committee, i 100% committed to both reducing spending and made it my obligation to defend this nation. it is equally im
. what about mature democracies? we just had an election in this country. did that teach any lessons? were there any technology lessons to be drawn from this year's election? >> it is always hard to reason. the winners get to write history. the losers think about the next election. there is no question the obama campaign had a technology strategy that helped elect the president. there were targeted programs to get out the vote. to me, the way to say this is governments are going to change, too, because governments spend an awful lot of time delivering service, and now we can measure them. if you ask me to donate money, we can now check to see if that money actually got their. another check and balance on the corruption-major things. we can test the effectiveness of programs. to give you some worries some examples. governments can know where people are and figure out what people report that they are doing versus what they are really doing. there are all sorts of worrisome scenarios that you can imagine. the slippery slope. i will give you one in britain. in london, when you're walking
as it will witness elections across the country and the end of u.s. and isaf combat operations. as president obama, secretary of state clinton and many of this room have emphasized this transition provides us with the opportunity for diplomatic and cultural relations between our peoples. at georgetown, we are proud to be a part of this critical work notably through the u.s.-afghan women's council. the council is a public private partnership that has been housed here at the university since 2008. it was founded in 2002 by president karzai and president bush in support of afghan women and children. it's focused its work of areas of education, health, economic empowerment, leadership development, and humanitarian assistance. since its founding the council has created call laarships, provided skills training, litteracy and health care, established a burn center to treat victims and provide reconstructive surgery and provide leadership training for afghan women. in recent years we have witnessed significant improvements of the lives of women and children throughout afghanistan. educational opportunitie
in a democracy. meaningful democracy cannot exist when moneyed interests can buy elections and lobby of legislation. for example, 2/3 of americans support -- but in a logical fashion in congress is committed to blocking reform in this area. add to this list, concerted efforts to restrict bargaining rights of unions to deprive people of the right to vote and you appreciate the full measure of the democratic crisis we face. fourth and final issue is the challenge of finding a way to manage the economy and provide a good life for everyone. no solution to the problems of climate destruction can be found, the developed world reducing its level of carbon emissions. these four issues and a quality, corruption, inequality, corruption, crisis of democracy, sustainability fuelled the occupy movement. what we tried to do was explore and analyze the origins and see what can be done to bring our institutions to enlightenment. we also wanted to bring these four issues together into a narrative. we chose to route our narrative in american ideals of freedom and equality. to say that the ideas of fre
, it is an aggressive agenda. it is a lot of work. but they elect us to lead, my friends. we will. they elect us to perform and we will. we have proven that we can lead. we have proven that we can perform. we know that with these challenges at hand that is exactly what we must now do. we have daunting challenges. no doubt. but these challenges also pose exciting opportunities. yes, it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems, i know the issues. but, can you imagine how smart this state would be when we actually educate all our children to the best of the god given potential. when every black child and every white child and every urban child is educated to their full potential. i know helping the economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed and all of our cities are at full gain. i know women is have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historic. i know it is difficult. can you imagine what this soc
and despite the election results, the position that has been taken on the part of house republicans is that we have to do it our way. if we don't, we simply will not pay america's bills. that cannot be a position that is sustainable over time. it's not one that is good for the economy now and it will not be the precedent i want to establish not just for my presidency but for the future. even if it was on the other side. democrats do not like voting for the debt ceiling yet you never saw a situation in which democrats suggested that we would go ahead and all that we did not get our way 100%. that's not how it works. >> on the issue of guns, given how typical it will be, impossible, to get any gun- control measure passed through this congress, what are you willing or able to do using the powers of your presidency to act without congress? i would also like to know what you make of these long lines we're seeing at gun shows and gun stores all around the country? even in connecticut, applications are up since the shooting. >> my understanding of the vice- president will provide a range of steps we
. [applause] to the elected and legislative to have been introducede before -- [applause] attorney general eric schneiderman, thank you for being here. senators, pleasure to be with you. i want to thank them for their leadership. the legislative accomplishments to really turn this state around. they were difficult and challenging because it went to the real heart of the issues. at this time i would ask the assembly and senate to stand so you can be recognized for your great work. [applause] members of the court, welcome to all of you. [applause] the capital looks a little bit different than it did over the past few years. the renovation has been complete. it was accelerated. it was extended. the building has been refurbished. it's skylights are open. it is in better shape than it has been in many, many years. [applause] i remember the first time i walked into the capital, when i was a young fellow, how i was awed and overwhelmed by the beauty and majesty of the building. somewhere along the way, it lost that luster. both physically and symbolically. we had a great team that worked tireless
't going to be done until the next election or until something else changes. this is something that clearly, particularly republicans in the house really want to push. they're going to use every opportunity that they can. we managed to get some of the tax issues taken off the table at the end of last year. that was difficult for a lot of us to watch. but there's still some questions about spending. that's going to come up in the next couple of months. there's appropriations to be done. i imagine that conversation will keep on going. and i was very worried after i first came back to work after the break, because i said, well, what is this going to do for the immigration agenda? having covered this in the past, i know how much energy it takes from members. but i don't think that the members who are going to be the most involved in the fiscal cliff spending kinds of discussions are the same ones who are going to be pushing on immigration. and as long as you have someone in the senate, like majority leader harry reid, who also wants to move forward, i think you're still going to see some action
gratitude. let's give him another round of applause. [applause] to the elected and legislative leaders who have been introduced once before, it's a pleasure to be with you. attorney general, thank you for being here. co-leaders senators, pleasure to be with you, assembly speaker, snot minority leader -- senate minority leader. assembly minority leader, i want to thank them for their leadership because last year and the year before were extraordinary years for this state. and the legislative accomplishments really turned this state around and they were difficult and challenging because it went to the real heart of the issues. but they did it. at this time i would ask the assembly and senate to stand so you can be recognized for your great work. stand please. [applause] members of the court, welcome to all of you, we thank you. [applause] >> as you heard earlier and i hope as you can tell the capitol looks a little bit different than it did over the past few years. the renovation has been complete. the renovation was accelerated and extended. it's complete. the building has been refurbished,
rockefeller announced he will not seek reelection when his term ends in 2014. he is first elected to the senate in 1984. he served as the governor of west virginia from 1977 until 1985. this is about 20 minutes. >> thank you, sharon. so incredibly much. a perfect life, by far the most popular rockefeller and west virginia. -- wife, by far, the most popular rockefeller in west virginia. i will get right to them. i have decided not to run again at the conclusion of this term. not now, but in 2014. i hope each of you can understand that this is an entirely personal decision. it is not a political decision and it is not easy. it is simply this. as i approached 50 years of nonstop public service, precluding time with the children and sharon. i consider the ways for travel in life. there are many other ways, and i know deep within me that in 2014, it is the right time for me to recalibrate and find a new balance. i came as an untrained social worker back in 1964. i actually begun my public service for years before that, working for the peace corps and the department of state. frankly, i
that unemployment in selby and ainsty is down by a quarter since the last election? >> i will certainly join my honorable friend in that. the people in our job centers up and down the country do an excellent job helping people to find work and to make sure that they get all the help they need. the fact is that the unemployment rate today is lower than the rate that we inherited at the last election. over the last year, job creation in britain was faster than in any other g-7 country. we still have a long way to go to rebalance our economy and to get the growth in the private sector that we need, but we are on the right track -- 1 million new private sector jobs over the last two years, the fastest rate of new business creation for decades. there are good signs that the economy is rebalancing. we need to encourage that by staying on top of our deficit and getting it down, rather than just giving in on every decision, as we have seen today from the party opposite. >> according to the children's society, up to 40,000 soldiers, 150,000 teachers and 300,000 nurses will lose out as a result of the pr
the politicians learned from the election when republicans i believe thought they would win not just the white house but the senate and the house of representatives that the public is sending a message and i hope everyone in congress is listening. it's time to get things done. >> put aside the egos, hang them up with a coat, and let's gret things done. >> last question. >> we talk a lot about what democrats want to see pass in the republican house. what's one thing that republicans are asking for that you think democrats could pass through the house and senate and get signed by the president? >> i think there are a number of things. i think we can deal with the fiscal issues in a bipartisan balanced way. you can't just do it with one side doing all the lifting and everybody else getting off scoth free. the president has been trying for two years. we've came close but speaker boehner walked away from the deal. i suspect we're going to have a chance to see a big deal surface again. i hope this time republicans are willing to take it. >> thank you for giving us your time this week. >> we are back
electoral committee is taking shape. the elections for one-third of the senate posts are on their way. citizens' freedoms are there, as well. corruption is losing ground, and organized crime has no more sanctuary. slowly but surely, justice is becoming more just. in the chapter of human rights, there is a ratification during my time of office of the agreements and conventions which will mean that there will be no prescription for certain crimes, we'll time limits on them, and with your help, we will work to assure that there is equal opportunities, equality, and the protection of children. all of these things will come to pass. the first things are there. honorable members of parliament, at the start, you had an economic europe and the funding powers of the ecb, and you understood this, and the ecb countries were following, as must haiti. your support for our major infrastructure works. national roads, number three, where a large stretch was recently opened it. this motorway it already is doing its part to make our economy more dynamic and to open up the hill country for the regional
fundamental reforms are possible but the president made this a defining issue in the election. to passe was going preserver medicare -- it was unrealistic to expect this would be front and center during the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> the president says he does not favor changing medicare but on the other hand, he says he favors increasing use of managed care. does that go to the same place from a different direction? >> as you know, i have a certain track record with premium support which is actually a label that can of an article that henry aaron and i wrote in 1995. it was a very different approach, not moderately different, from what congressman ryan has pursued. i have a lot of sympathy for moving in that direction. in a sensible kind of way and we already have the medicare advantage component of medicare. we are about -- about 1/4 of beneficiaries to to get their benefits through a plan offered by some private entity that agrees to take a risk-adjusted payment to cover medicare desk type benefits for people who enroll in its. . motta fighting that program gradually over a decade
, long ways to go. wasunited states of america 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the port -- of the puzzle is to elect pro- choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with our approach was anyway. -- our pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how many times did you need to out -- be asked before you ran? the women had to be asked seven times before they would say yes. and of the men cannot they did not reall
. these guys used hawks, they elect hawks to take over their government and they are hardliners who will not bend when it comes to the palestinians or other middle eastern countries. we need someone to let them know that it is time to make a change in how they relate to the countries around them so that we can have peace in the middle east. there will not be a way as long as they consistently say that they will retaliate against anything that happens. host: two phone calls about israel -- this is "the baltimore sun" -- we will hear from joyce in lincoln, neb., a republican caller -- caller: i am very interested in the former senator chuck hagel getting in. i had an opportunity to work closely with him and another congressman in lincoln, neb. in the gulf war and the last war. one thing the former senator said that caught my attention was that he is not a clock, if he is an owl. i think read where -- i think we really need a neutral position to look at this situation and get us out of the political arena. i watched a program earlier on c-span and it was all men from the different coll
here in this chamber as the duely elected member of the assembly continues his hard work and does honor to his memory. thank you. just three months ago, we were proceeding normally with our lives getting ready for a national election and the holidays to follow. then sandy hit. sandy was the worst storm to strike new jersey in our history. 346,000 homes were damaged or destroyed. nearly 7 million people and over 1,000 schools were without power. 116,000 new jerseyens were evacuated or displayed from their homes. 41,000 families are still displaced from their homes today. sandy may have damaged our homes and our infrastructure, but it did not destroy our spirit. the people of new jersey have comes together as never before across party lines, across ideological lines, across ages, and races, and backgrounds. from all parts of our state. even from out of state. everyone has come together. so today, let me start this address with a set of thank yous from me on behalf of the people of this great state. first, i want to thank the brave first responders, the national guard, and emergency manage
am so pleased to see his wife betty lou here in this chamber as a duly elected member of the assembly today. she continues his work and does honor to his memory. thank you, betty lou. [applause] just three months ago, we were proceeding normally with our lives, getting ready for a national election and the holidays to follow. then sandy hit. sandy was the worst storm to strike new jersey in 100 years. 346,000 homes were damaged or destroyed. nearly 7 million people and 1,000 schools had their power knocked out. 116,000 new jerseyans were evacuated or displaced from their homes. 41,000 families are still displaced from their homes. sandy may have damaged our homes and our infrastructure, but it did not destroy our spirit. the people of new jersey have come together as never before -- across party lines, across ideological lines, across ages, races and backgrounds, from all parts of our state, even from out of state. everyone has come together. so today, let me start this address with a set of thank- yous from me on behalf of the great people of this state. first, i want to thank the br
as a duly elected member of the assembly today. she continues his work and does honor to his memory. just three months ago, we were proceeding normally with our lives, getting ready for a national election and the holidays to follow. then sandy hit. sandy was the worst storm to strike new jersey in 100 years. 346,000 homes were damaged or destroyed. nearly 7 million people and 1,000 schools had their power knocked out. 116,000 new jerseyans were evacuated or displaced from their homes. 41,000 families are still displaced from their homes. sandy may have damaged our homes and our infrastructure, but it did not destroy our spirit. the people of new jersey have come together as never before -- across party lines, across ideological lines, across ages, races and backgrounds, from all parts of our state, even from out of state. everyone has come together. so today, let me start this address with a set of thank-yous from me on behalf of the great people of this state. first, i want to thank the brave first responders, national guard, and emergency management experts who prepared us for this sto
congratulations to the newly elected leadership of the democratic and republican caucuses in each chamber, and especially to speaker sharkey and majority leader aresimowicz as they take on their new roles. congratulations as well to the new members of the general assembly who were sworn in earlier today. i look forward to working with you in the months and years ahead. as we gather in this historic chamber, let us always keep in our thoughts the brave men and women of the great state of connecticut serving in our armed forces around the globe. we thank them and our veterans for their service and sacrifice, and we pray for their continued safety. i'd like to recognize my wonderful wife cathy and my sons daniel and sam who join us today. as i know is true for so many of you, i could not do my job without the tremendous love and support of my family. finally, we are joined by two of newtown's finest leaders -- first selectwoman pat llodra and school superintendent dr. janet robinson. it's an honor to have you with us today. [applause] tested by unimaginable tragedy, your compassion and leade
interests can buy elections and lobby of legislation. for example, 2/3 of americans support -- but in a logical fashion in congress is committed to blocking reform in this area. add to this list, concerted efforts to restrict bargaining rights of unions to deprive people of the right to vote and you appreciate the full measure of the democratic crisis we face. fourth and final issue is the challenge of finding a way to manage the economy and provide a good life for everyone. no solution to the problems of climate destruction can be -- climate disruption can be found, the developed world reducing its level of carbon emissions. these four issues and a quality, -- inequality, corruption, inequality, corruption, crisis of democracy, sustainability fuelled the occupy movement. what we tried to do was explore and analyze the origins and see what can be done to bring our institutions to enlightenment. we also wanted to bring these four issues together into a narrative. we chose to route our narrative in american ideals of freedom and equality. to say that the ideas of freedom and e
elected representatives although i consider myself neither a republican or democrat i look forward to working closely on both sides of the aisle. most importantly, my wife cathy to my children kyle, to my parents in new jersey, a shout out. owen who is 92. i can not be where i am today without their love, patience, understanding, and support. there's no way i can ever repay them except to say i will need it for a little bit longer. i am deeply grateful for this opportunity. it will be bittersweet to leave all of my close colleagues and friends here at the white house and that the national security staff but come to work with in respect so deeply. if confirmed by the senate i will consider it to be an honor of my life. >> these are four outstanding individuals. we are grateful to all of them. i want in particular to think mike morrell and leon panetta for their extraordinary service. i just want to repeat i hope the senate will act on these confirmations promptly. when it comes to security we do not bite to leave a lot of gaps between the time one set of leaders transitions out of a
into the people's house to address you. i'd like to offer my sincere congratulations to the newly elected leadership of the democratic and republican caucuses in each chamber, and especially to speaker sharkey and majority leader aresimowicz as they take on their new roles. congratulations as well to the new members of the general assembly who were sworn in earlier today. i look forward to working with you in the months and years ahead. as we gather in this historic chamber, let us always keep in our thoughts the brave men and women of the great state of connecticut serving in our armed forces around the globe. we thank them and our veterans for their service and sacrifice, and we pray for their continued safety. i'd like to recognize my wonderful wife cathy and my sons daniel and sam who join us today. thank you. [applause] as i know is true for so many of you, i could not do my job without the tremendous love and support of my family. finally, we are joined by two of newtown's finest leaders -- first selectwoman pat llodra and school superintendent dr. janet robinson. it's an honor to h
back to f.d.r. and the 1932 election that's how he was able to emerge the wets and the dries and begin to move our country through some understanding of a contentious issue that ultimately has good and bad effects no matter how we sort it out. so make congress relevant. and demand that they do it because what else are they doing to help us out in the trenches? the president win noss matter what. he's already won. he got more votes in colorado as george southerlies said because of the turn toout from this amendment which by the way dwarfed his own vote in my state which he won unexpectedly. the president will be vague. the justice department, i hope they'll continue to be vague. they don't need to tell people how they're going to enforce the law. the laws are on the books. quit whining about we need eric holder to tell us what to do. stop it. we're americans. we know they have prosecutorial discretion. congress can step up. don't whine about the administration. the president's already won. the states could win big. we have a robust debate in colorado right now going on. i talked about t
of the elections. so, the sulzberger's basically own the newspaper, or the family. we will come to that in a minute. if you guys want to sit down, there are plenty of seats here. so we are talking about the sulzberger's, and they own a newspaper, and went on to be a public newspaper under arthur ochs sulzberger, who recently died. that became not a privately- owned company but a public company. this is interesting because it is now a public company. one of the things people are wondering is why, if "the times" is having a financial crisis -- which is my next subheading -- how can they survive? the answer is, how can "the times" survive? we will talk about that. maybe we can talk about it now. will they survive as they now exist, can it, financially? "the times" is in great trouble in a chilly. -- financially. the sulzberger's made a lot of money when they went public. they bought up a lot of properties, they have the discovery channel for a while, and at the time of optimism they built an enormous building which they own for a short amount of time and now they lease it, sold back. so "the times" is
guantanamo bay is probably much higher than the dollar cost. at the end of the presidential election, one of my friends in japan -- i'm japanese -- wrote to me and said it is a pity that the american people -- the better choice for the american people was a flunky such as president obama. the reason he called president obama that was because he cannot even deliver on the very simple statement that he's going to close guantanamo bay. listening to you, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can
please clear the well. the chair will proceed when the house is in order. the representatives-elect have presented themselves in the house. the representative hfed elect will raise their right hand. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, and that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you're about to enter, so help you god? congratulations, you're now members of the 113th congress. under clause d of rule 20, the chair announces to the house that in light of the administration of the oath to the gentlewoman from florida and the gentlemen from oregon and california, the whole number of the house is now 433. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from colorado seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i move that the house -- madam speaker. i move that the -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman wi
? they were elected to do a job. they put their pants on just like the rest of us. who are they? we hold these people into high regards -- in too high regards for what they are doing for this country. i need to bring this people down to this level so they understand what is going on in this country and not worry about who will be the next president. we have got a president. he should do his job as well as the rest that are in washington. i do not know why people hold these people so high above everybody else. who can take a $218 million a day vacation or a boat ride in this country unless you are a dr. or lawyer? then it will be a short vacation. who can do that? where do they think this money comes from? it doesn't just come up out of the ground. as far as the debt ceiling is concerned, yes, it should be tied together. if we do not quit spending, we will not have anything left to spend. --ry, twitter a different perspective from twitter -- let us hear from william, virginia, has to say. caller: i consider myself an independent. i used to be in the cracked and republican. dax i used to b
. sources close to them confirmed that he will try to win election to the seat formerly held by tim scott. host: apparently not so much these days, with him planning to run again. also want to point out this story from "the washington post." "u.s. military fighter jets provided back up to a failed french hostage rescue mission, the white house's knowledge sunday in a rare public acknowledgement of american combat operations in the horn of africa." host: we have a few minutes left on this subject of entertainment and video game violence, their role and responsibility in this ongoing national debate. mike, louisiana, on the independent line, good morning. caller: good morning. i just wanted to say that i play these types of games. i know a lot of people who do. none of us are violent people at all. pretty much all of the people who are doing this stuff, like the guy in newtown, they'll have mental problems, you know? before there were these types of games or any kind of entertainment, really, there were good people back then. i do not think that these games or videos or anything like that h
-- to this day, a man is set to go to prison for killing a man who was elected to be involved in torture -- talking about torture will get you sent to prison. committing torture makes you a hero. jose rodriguez and all these people who have written books, and they are heroes in the eyes of folks who believe that artworks, and they are walking free, and we're sending somebody to prison for their words and nobody has gone to prison for their actions. i think the drone program is another area where it is a mistake to talk about a program -- we have a military program and governed by the loss of four. you hear people talking about -- the laws of war. you hear talk about the rules and distinctions that regulate the armed forces, and by following those roles, military personnel have combated unit -- immunity. you killed during combat, it is not murder. you have a community as a combatant. collateral damage is a corollary of that. if you drop a bomb and it kills the bad guy and some guys around them, as long as you applied the principles of laws of war, then those deaths are collateral damage.
was his point person to the committee to re-elect the president. he was the one who conveyed to alderman the information that g. gordon liddy, that his espionage plan had been approved. so he would know what details alderman and i think nixon knew about the liddy plan. he wouldn't do it. and sadly, pat buchanan, i tried very hard to get pat buchanan to do it, he wouldn't do it. >> robert bork who was the acting attorney general at the time -- this is another issue. he's 85. still here with us. this is the issue of spiro agnew. >> by the way, one of the things that happened is you learn things. i thought in the beginning i was going to hear stories that many of them had said, through the history channel, when you do an interview for the government, it becomes public domain. i was really keen on creating free individual yes. it belongs to everybody now. i assumed they would tell stories in proprietary collections. what i started to get, what we started to get were stories i had never heard before. this is one of them. this is unbelievable, this is bork talking about how he and the attorney
mentioned that is enormously important was the rise of islamist parties. they had been elected in tunisia, egypt, and probably will be elected in turkey and other countries. do you think that having islam is inside the tent in a helpscal smear a-- sphere diminish the threat of outside groups like al qaeda? >> hopefully political pluralism is breaking out in the middle east. countries will find expressions with political parties. we are strong advocates of using the political system, the laws, to be able to express their individual groups within different countries. rather than finding expression through violent extremism, these groups have the opportunity as they never had before in countries like tunisia and in egypt, yemen and other places, where they can participate meaningfully within a system. this will take some time for the system to mature sufficiently so that there can be a very robust system there. certainly, those individuals who are associated with parties that have a religious basis, they can have the opportunity in that system. >> my second question, you mentioned yemen. tha
charter. fourthly, we put to the people, and the conference of dialogue to agree a dialogue for elections. anything to do with constitution and the law, we can say if in the conference dialogue the government can carry out whatever is agreed on. the third stage. firstly, a new government to be set up in accordance with the constitution. and also, we have a general congress to have reconciliation and give amnesty to everyone in prison. thirdly, to reestablish the infrastructure and compensate people who have suffered damages. also, talking about amnesty, the country can forfeit its rights. however, we cannot give amnesty on behalf of people because it is the civil right to. amnesty would be general, and only by this amnesty we can get into national reconsolation, when everyone forgives everyone else. these are the main features of the political solution, as we see it. these are only just the headlines that need details, which the government will begin to put details and expand on these points and put this vision in the form of an initiative. this would be followed up in accordance with the
not listening to the public. i hope what the politicians learn from the election is that the public is sending a message. i hope everyone in congress is listening. it is time to get things done. put aside the egos, hang them up with a coat, let's get things done. >> one minute left. >> we talk about what democrats want to see passed. >> we can deal with these fiscal issues a bipartisan, balanced way. you cannot just do it with one side doing the listening. i believe we can come up with a balanced approach. the president has been trying for two years. speaker boehner walked away from the deal. i suspect we will have a chance to see a big deal surfaced again. i hope this time, republicans are willing to take it. >> mr. becerra, thanks very much. we're back with ginger gibson of "political." and mike lillis of "the hill." the democrats have picked up eight seats in the congress. the white house wants to have both houses under democratic control for its last two years of obama presidency where is the incentive for the two parties to get along co? >> i do not see much of one. republicans are going
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)